Abstract

What hospital would not want a clinical information system (IS) where all information, orders and prescriptions for an individual patient are available in one place and accessible as needed? Many hospitals introduce these systems to much enthusiasm. Yet, a few months later, this positive attitude often deteriorates into frustration and even organized resistance. Sometimes, faced with outright rebellion, management is forced to withdraw the system or its most disrupting features, reverting to former practices. Indeed, many hospitals interrupt such projects after investing millions in software acquisition and implementation (Anderson 1997; Doolin 1999; Greene 2003).