Abstract

Regionalization has strengths and weaknesses. The balance of the two will vary over time, differing in different contexts and with different implementations. Alberta's implementation of a centralized structure had some strengths: economies of scale and expertise; opportunities for province-wide learning; internalization of geographic politics; and improved geographic equity. It also had weaknesses: diseconomies of scale, remoteness from communities and politicization.

In any implementation of regionalization, policy makers should attempt to realize the benefits of alternative paths not travelled and minimise the weaknesses of the chosen structure.