Healthcare Policy

Healthcare Policy 16(4) May 2021 : 6-14.doi:10.12927/hcpol.2021.26503
Editorial

COVID-19 and a Window into Healthcare Providers’ Resiliency

Jason M. Sutherland

As contemporaneous data emerge from publicly funded healthcare providers, the COVID-19 pandemic provides a unique opportunity to measure their resiliency. Resiliency matters because it connotes a higher level of confidence in being able to provide needed healthcare during times of health, social or environmental stress or calamity. 

At the beginning of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020, there were warnings regarding hospitals' ability to successfully manage large surges of critically ill COVID-19 patients who were expected to soon be presenting at hospitals in every province and territory. Shortly thereafter, hospitals implemented policies to clear hospital beds – there were public reports that hospitals rapidly went from nearly full occupancy to below 50% (CIHI 2020a; Howlett 2020; Zeidler 2020).

The fact that hospitals were able to free thousands of their beds so quickly was a remarkable metamorphosis. As recently as 2019, hospital occupancy in Ontario was often above 95% and grappling with seemingly immovable patients waiting for other settings of care (Bender and Holyoke 2018; Government of Ontario 2019).

Measuring Hospital Resiliency

Clearing hospital beds and quickly transitioning many patients to other care settings provided evidence that hospitals, in conjunction with their community's other health and social care providers, had adaptive resilience (Thomas et al. 2013). This is a valuable attribute that indicates that hospitals are able to absorb health-related disasters while continuing to provide critical healthcare to their communities.

But clearing hospitals came at what cost? There is no evidence yet from provinces or territories that moving patients from hospitals earlier than planned caused detectable increases in premature mortality or excess morbidity. Perhaps this evidence will emerge; though if it does not, and if these gains in hospital efficiency can be maintained without jeopardizing patient outcomes, it would show the hospitals' ability to quickly build new and effective processes of care.

Yet, the financial resilience of hospitals is still very murky. In the short term, the majority of hospitals' funding comes from global budgets, and they should have no problem meeting their fixed costs since they have very little wiggle room to reduce spending. In the medium term, provincial and territorial governments will reckon with fewer patients having had access to elective treatments while surgical wait lists continued to expand. In British Columbia, for example, the policy response was to commit hundreds of millions of new spending to increase surgical capacity (Government of British Columbia 2020). In the longer term, governments' intentions to bankroll expanded capacity are unclear, and the consequences may be some combination of financial insecurity for hospitals and their skilled staff, erosion of services or longer waits for non-life-threatening care.

Resiliency in Other Sectors

Perhaps the cost of clearing hospitals was borne by long-term care? While this public health emergency has shown some evidence of resilience among hospitals, the same cannot be said for long-term care. A confluence of resident, staff, care home, health system and social care factors contributed to, in some instances, disastrous outcomes for residents of long-term care, their families and the staff (Holroyd-Leduc and Laupacis 2020). It will take years to unpack the impact of the lack of resiliency in long-term care and repair the gaps that COVID-19 revealed (Armstrong et al. 2020; Webster 2021).

Some statistical evidence shows that privately provided physician care demonstrated adaptive resilience, with over 50% of care being provided virtually within a few months of the onset of the pandemic (CIHI 2020b). Maintaining these transformative changes in the delivery of physician care may particularly benefit those residing in rural or remote areas and for whom travel is expensive and inconvenient.

Beyond long-term care and physician care, clear indicators of resilience from other sectors are yet to emerge. Nursing homes and home care similarly grappled with an influx of patients discharged from hospitals earlier than usual. Because these sectors are financed by a mix of private and public funds, their financial resilience is particularly important for maintaining stability in capacity for healthcare provided in the community.

Monitoring Resilience for the Future

The unfolding saga of the COVID-19 pandemic and the stressors that it induced upon the provinces' and territories' healthcare providers have shown some strengths and weaknesses of the regions' health and social care systems.

It is highly desirable for provinces and territories to have resilient healthcare providers who will continue to deliver healthcare irrespective of the challenges of future large-scale disasters. Health system resiliency matters because we want to avoid unnecessary suffering and premature death.

The features of provinces' and territories' resiliency will include the ability to adapt to new challenges, such as the COVID-19 pandemic; transform practices to incorporate new technologies; and remain solvent. With these points in mind, provinces and territories should develop a process for monitoring and investing in strengthening the resilience of all healthcare sectors on an ongoing basis.

This Issue of Healthcare Policy

This issue of Healthcare Policy is led by a discussion and debate article, which engages the reader to consider the short- and longer-term health and social consequences of higher levels of alcohol consumption induced by the COVID-19 pandemic (Hartney 2021). Concerningly, the author notes that due to provincial infection-control policies and social distancing recommendations from public health offices, access to healthcare and social services for over-consumption may be commensurately less accessible during this time of heightened need. The article calls for federal and provincial governments to enact policies to enhance access to prevention programs designed to lessen alcohol overuse, especially among high-risk groups, in order to mitigate future health and social harms.

The discussion and debate article is followed by a rejoinder, whose authors jointly focus on provinces' policies to loosen controls that increase the availability of alcohol during the pandemic (Lange and Rehm 2021). The authors reinforce the associations between boredom, stress and convenience with alcohol overuse. The rejoinder extends the discussion of pandemic-related alcohol overuse by calling for provinces to reduce the availability of alcohol and for enhanced screening and interventions to target alcohol overuse.

Research Papers

This issue's first research paper focuses on the prevalence of mental health problems among nurses in British Columbia (Havaei et al. 2021). Referencing complex and intertwined work-related risk factors, the paper states that elevated levels of depression, anxiety and other mental health problems have been associated with absenteeism, nurses' feelings of reduced personal accomplishment and emotional overextension and exhaustion. Applying a cross-sectional survey design, the authors found excess mental health problems among nurses and recommend confidential assessment of nurses' mental health and structural changes in their workflow in order to address the causal factors that lead to mental health problems.

Next, a team of authors conducted a scoping review of patients' preferences for healthcare among those with specific health conditions (Peckham et al. 2021). Citing reforms to align healthcare and improve patient-centredness, the authors undertook an extensive review of the literature to identify and measure the needs, desires and preferences of patients. The review found five themes of preferences across a number of health states: personalized care, information, choice, holistic care and coordinated/continuity of care. This study has policy implications relevant to determining who should be a part of the care team, how to effectively engage with patients of differing health states and how to design healthcare improvement initiatives that align with the preferences of patients.

Targeting overcrowding and extended waits in hospitals' emergency departments, the next paper reports on the findings of a quantitative analysis of emergency department lengths of stays in a sample of urban regions' hospitals in western Canada (Kreindler et al. 2021). Anchored with cross-sectional data from the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System, the extensive modeling found no clear evidence of high or low performers. The authors conclude that to relieve the pressure on emergency departments, policies to support new models of ambulatory care are needed, including those that reflect local needs and their community's capacity.

In the context of language proficiency and inadequate patient–provider communication, the next paper analyzes two data sets to measure concordance between physicians' and patients' use of non-official languages in a sample of the largest urban areas of Canada (Ariste and Matteo 2021). Data sourced from Scott's Medical Database and the 2016 Census highlighted instances of discordance between physicians' use of non-official languages and the percentage of the community speaking the same non-official languages. The authors conclude by describing the complex ethnic and gender differences they found and outline a number of policy options for provinces to enhance the supply of physicians that speak the same language as the community.

The final paper in this issue reports on the findings of a time-driven activity-based costing study in an ophthalmology integrated practice unit at the Kensington Eye Institute in Ontario (Sadri et al. 2021). Time-driven activity-based costing is a process for accurately attributing input costs to health outcomes through close measurement of clinical workflow. The information gained from this process informs decision makers about where to allocate their efforts and resources to reduce unwarranted variability or inefficiencies. This study demonstrated that the time-driven activity-based costing process was feasible and generated actionable information for the Kensington Eye Institute. The paper concludes with recommendations for scaling up this process to improve value from healthcare spending.

Jason M. Sutherland, PhD

Editor-in-Chief

 


 

ÉDITORIAL

COVID-19 et regard sur la résilience des fournisseurs de soins de santé

La pandémie de covid-19 présente l'occasion de mesurer la résilience des fournisseurs de soins de santé financés par l'état, notamment avec la venue de nouvelles données. La résilience est importante car elle implique un niveau de confiance plus élevé dans la capacité de fournir les soins nécessaires en période de problèmes et désastres sanitaires, sociaux ou environnementaux.

Lors de la première vague de la pandémie de COVID-19, au début de 2020, des avertissements ont été émis concernant la capacité des hôpitaux à gérer avec succès de grands volumes de patients gravement atteints, qui se présenteraient dans les hôpitaux des provinces et territoires. Peu de temps après, les hôpitaux ont mis en æuvre des politiques de dégagement des lits d'hôpital — les rapports publics indiquent en effet que les hôpitaux sont rapidement passés d'une occupation presque complète à moins de 50% (ICIS 2020a; Howlett 2020; Zeidler 2020).

Il est remarquable que les hôpitaux aient pu libérer des milliers de lits aussi rapidement. Pas plus tard qu'en 2019, le taux d'occupation des hôpitaux ontariens était souvent supérieur à 95%; des patients apparemment immobiles attendaient des places dans d'autres milieux de soins (Bender et Holyoke 2018; Gouvernement de l'Ontario 2019).

Mesurer la résilience des hôpitaux

Le dégagement des lits d'hôpital et le transfert rapide de nombreux patients vers d'autres milieux de soins démontrent que les hôpitaux, en collaboration avec les autres fournisseurs de soins de santé et sociaux, ont fait preuve d'une résilience adaptative (Thomas et al. 2013). Cela indique que les hôpitaux sont capables d'absorber des catastrophes d'ordre sanitaire, tout en continuant à fournir des soins de santé essentiels.

Mais à quel prix s'est fait ce dégagement des lits? Il n'y a pas encore de données provinciales ou territoriales qui indiquent à quel point le déplacement des patients a entraîné une augmentation détectable de mortalité prématurée ou de morbidité excessive. Peut-être que les données en ce sens émergeront; mais si ce n'était pas le cas, et si les gains d'efficacité des hôpitaux pouvaient être main-tenus sans compromettre les résultats pour les patients, cela démontrerait la capacité des hôpitaux à mettre en place rapidement de nouveaux processus de soins efficaces.

Pourtant, la résilience financière des hôpitaux est beaucoup moins claire. à court terme, la majorité du financement des hôpitaux provient des budgets globaux, et ils ne devraient pas avoir de problème à couvrir leurs coûts fixes puisqu'ils ont très peu de marge de manæuvre pour la réduction des dépenses. à moyen terme, les gouvernements provinciaux et territoriaux compteront moins de patients ayant eu accès à des traitements non urgents, tandis que les listes d'attente pour les chirurgies continueront de s'allonger. En Colombie-Britannique, par exemple, la réponse politique a été d'engager des centaines de millions en nouvelles dépenses afin d'accroître la capacité chirurgicale (Gouvernement de la Colombie-Britannique 2020). à plus long terme, l'intention des gouvernements de financer une capacité accrue n'est pas claire et il pourrait en résulter une combinaison d'insécurité financière pour les hôpitaux et le personnel, d'érosion des services et d'attentes plus longues pour les problèmes de santé qui ne mettent pas la vie en danger.

Résilience des autres secteurs

Le coût du dégagement des lits d'hôpital a-t-il été déplacé vers les soins de longue durée? Si la situation d'urgence en matière de santé publique a permis de démontrer la résilience des hôpitaux, on ne peut pas en dire autant des soins de longue durée. Une confluence de facteurs liés aux résidents, au personnel, aux foyers de soins, au système de santé et aux services sociaux a donné, dans certains cas, des résultats catastrophiques pour les bénéficiaires, leurs familles et le personnel (Holroyd-Leduc et Laupacis 2020). Il faudra des années pour comprendre l'impact du manque de résilience dans les soins de longue durée et pour rectifier les lacunes révélées par la COVID-19 (Armstrong et al. 2020; Webster 2021).

Certaines données statistiques montrent que les soins médicaux fournis par le secteur privé ont fait preuve de résilience adaptative, avec plus de 50% des soins offerts de façon virtuelle dans les mois suivant le début de la pandémie (ICIS 2020b). Le maintien de ces changements dans la prestation des soins médicaux peut particulièrement profiter aux personnes qui résident dans des régions rurales ou éloignées et pour qui les déplacements sont coûteux ou peu pratiques.

Outre les soins de longue durée et les soins médicaux, on attend l'émergence d'indicateurs clairs de la résilience des autres secteurs. Les maisons de soins infirmiers et les soins à domicile ont aussi été confrontés à un afflux de patients sortant des hôpitaux plus tôt que prévu. étant donné que ces secteurs sont financés par une combinaison de fonds privés et publics, leur résilience financière est particulièrement importante pour maintenir la capacité des services fournis dans la communauté.

Suivi de la résilience pour l'avenir

La saga de la pandémie de COVID-19 et les facteurs de stress qu'elle a induits sur les fournisseurs de soins de santé des provinces et des territoires ont montré certaines forces et faiblesses des systèmes de santé et de services sociaux.

Il est hautement souhaitable pour les provinces et les territoires de disposer de fournisseurs de soins de santé résilients qui continueront à fournir des soins de santé, quels que soient les défis des catastrophes à venir. La résilience du système de santé est primordiale pour éviter des souffrances inu-tiles et des décès prématurés.

La résilience des provinces et des territoires se caractérisera par leur capacité à s'adapter à de nouveaux défis, telle que la pandémie de COVID-19; par une transformation de la pratique afin d'y introduire les nouvelles technologies; et par leur solvabilité. En gardant ces éléments à l'esprit, les provinces et les territoires devraient pouvoir élaborer un processus de surveillance et de renforcement de la résilience dans tous les secteurs de la santé.

Dans le présent numéro de Politiques de Santé

Ce numéro présente un article de discussion et débat qui engage le lecteur à tenir compte des conséquences sociosanitaires à court et à long terme d'une consommation accrue d'alcool en raison de la pandémie de COVID-19 (Hartney 2021). L'auteure note qu'en raison des politiques de protection et de distanciation sociale émises par les bureaux de santé publique, les services sociosanitaires liés à la surconsommation pourraient être inversement moins accessibles en cette période de besoins accrus. L'article appelle les gouvernements fédéral et provinciaux à adopter des politiques pour favoriser l'accès aux programmes de prévention qui visent une réduction de la consommation excessive d'alcool, en particulier parmi les groupes à haut risque, afin d'atténuer d'éventuels problèmes de santé ou sociaux.

Cet article de discussion et de débat est suivi d'une réplique, où les auteurs se concentrent sur les politiques provinciales visant à assouplir les contrôles sur la disponibilité d'alcool pendant la pandémie (Lange et Rehm 2021). Ils soulignent le lien entre ennui, stress et facilité d'accès qui peuvent mener à l'abus d'alcool. Dans le même ordre d'idée, l'article appelle les provinces à réduire la disponibilité de l'alcool, à favoriser le dépistage et à améliorer les interventions qui ciblent la consommation excessive d'alcool.

Rapports de recherche

Le premier article de recherche porte sur la prévalence des problèmes de santé mentale chez les infirmières en Colombie-Britannique (Havaei et al. 2021). Faisant référence à des facteurs de risque complexes liés au travail, l'article indique que des niveaux élevés de dépression, d'anxiété et d'autres problèmes de santé mentale sont associés à l'absentéisme, au sentiment de moindre accomplissement personnel ainsi qu'à l'épuisement émotionnel. Au moyen d'une enquête transversale, les auteurs ont observé un excès de problèmes de santé mentale chez les infirmières et recommandent une évaluation confidentielle de leur santé mentale ainsi que des changements structurels dans les flux de travail afin de traiter les facteurs causaux.

Ensuite, une équipe d'auteurs a mené un examen de la portée des préférences des patients en matière de soins de santé parmi ceux qui souffrent de problèmes de santé spécifiques (Peckham et al. 2021). Citant les réformes visant à aligner les soins de santé et à améliorer l'approche centrée sur le patient, les auteurs ont entrepris un examen approfondi de la littérature afin d'identifier et de mesurer les besoins, les désirs et les préférences des patients. L'examen a révélé cinq thèmes de préférences pour un certain nombre d'états de santé: les soins personnalisés, la navigation, le choix, les soins holistiques et la continuité des soins. Cette étude est pertinente pour déterminer qui devrait faire partie des équipes de soins, comment s'engager efficacement avec les patients qui présentent différents états de santé et comment concevoir des initiatives d'amélioration des services de santé qui correspondent aux préférences des patients.

L'article suivant se penche sur la question de l'engorgement et des temps d'attente prolongés dans les services des urgences. On y rend compte des résultats d'une analyse quantitative sur la durée des séjours aux urgences dans un échantillon d'hôpitaux des régions urbaines de l'Ouest canadien (Kreindler et al. 2021). Au moyen de données transversales provenant du Système national d'information sur les soins ambulatoires, la modélisation approfondie n'a trouvé aucune preuve claire de performances élevées ou faibles. Les auteurs concluent que pour alléger la pression exercée sur les urgences, il faut se doter de politiques pour de nouveaux modèles de soins ambulatoires, notamment en reflétant les besoins locaux et la capacité des communautés.

Dans le contexte de la connaissance linguistique et des communications inadéquates entre patients et fournisseurs de soins, l'article suivant analyse deux ensembles de données pour mesurer la concordance entre l'utilisation par les médecins et les patients de langues non officielles, dans un échantillon provenant des plus grandes régions urbaines au Canada (Ariste et Matteo 2021). Les données de la base de données médicales Scott's et du recensement de 2016 mettent en évidence des cas de discordance entre l'utilisation par les médecins de langues non officielles et le pourcentage des membres de la communauté qui parlent ces langues. Les auteurs concluent en dressant le portrait des différences ethniques et sexuelles complexes qu'ils ont constatées et proposent des pistes afin d'opti-miser le nombre de médecins qui parlent la même langue que la communauté desservie.

Le dernier article du présent numéro rend compte des résultats d'une étude sur la méthode des coûts par activités en fonction du temps dans une unité d'ophtalmologie du Kensington Eye Institute, en Ontario (Sadri et al. 2021). L'établissement des coûts en fonction du temps et des activités est un processus qui permet d'attribuer avec précision les coûts des intrants aux résultats de santé grâce à une mesure précise du flux de travail clinique. Les informations ainsi obtenues éclairent les décideurs sur les domaines où allouer les efforts et les ressources afin de réduire la variabilité injustifiée ou les inefficacités. Cette étude a démontré que la méthode des coûts par activités en fonction du temps est faisable et génère des renseignements exploitables pour le Kensington Eye Institute. Le document se termine par des recommandations pour l'intensification de ce processus afin d'améliorer la valeur des dépenses de santé.

Jason M. Sutherland, PhD

Rédacteur en chef

Références

Ariste, R. et L. Di Matteo. 2021. Concordance des langues non officielles dans la pratique médicale en milieu urbain au Canada: implications pour les soins pendant la pandémie de COVID-19. Politiques de Santé 16(4): 84–96. doi:10.12927/hcpol.2021.26497.

Armstrong, P., V. Boscart, G. Donner, F. Ducharme, C. Estabrooks, C. Floog et al. Juin 2020. Rétablir la confiance: la COVID-19 et l'avenir des soins de longue durée. Société royale du Canada. Consulté le 12 avril 2021. <https://rsc-src.ca/sites/default/files/LTC%20PB%20%2B%20ES_FR_0.pdf>.

Bender, D. et P. Holyoke. 2018. Why Some Patients Who Do Not Need Hospitalization Cannot Leave: A Case Study of Reviews in 6 Canadian Hospitals. Healthcare Management Forum 31(4): 121–25. doi:10.1177/0840470418755408.

Gouvernement de la Colombie-Britannique. 7 mai 2020. A Commitment to Surgical Renewal in B.C. Consulté le 12 avril 2021. <https://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/health/conducting-health-research/surgical-renewal-plan. pdf>.

Gouvernement de l'Ontario. Janvier 2019. Soins de santé de couloir: un système sous tension. 1er rapport provisoire du Conseil du premier ministre pour l'amélioration des soins de santé et l'élimination de la médecine de couloir. Consulté le 12 avril 2021. <https://www.health.gov.on.ca/fr/public/publications/premiers_council/docs/ premiers_council_report.pdf>.

Hartney, E. 2021. La pandémie cachée de la consommation d'alcool pendant la COVID-19: un impératif en matière de leadership en santé au Canada. Politiques de Santé 16(4): 17–24. doi:10.12927/hcpol.2021.26502.

Havaei, F., A. Ma, M. Leiter et A. Gear. 2021. Description de l'état de santé mentale des infirmières en Colombie-Britannique: une enquête à l'échelle provinciale. Politiques de Santé 16(4): 31–45. doi:10.12927/hcpol.2021.26500.

Holroyd-Leduc, J.M. et A. Laupacis. 2020. Continuing Care and COVID-19: A Canadian Tragedy That Must Not Be Allowed to Happen Again. CMAJ 192(23): E632–33. doi:10.1503/cmaj.201017.

Howlett, K. 2020, 6 avril. Ontario Hospitals Scramble to Open More Beds as They Brace for Surge in Coronavirus Cases. The Globe and Mail. Consulté le 12 avril 2021. <https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-ontario-hospitals-scramble-to-open-more-beds-as-they-brace-for-surge/>.

Institut canadien d'information sur la santé (ICIS). 2020a, 19 novembre. Incidence de la COVID-19 sur les soins hospitaliers. Consulté le 12 avril 2021. <https://www.cihi.ca/fr/ressources-sur-la-covid-19/ lincidence-de-la-covid-19-sur-les-systemes-de-sante-du-canada/soins-hospitaliers>.

Institut canadien d'information sur la santé (ICIS). 2020b, 19 novembre. Aperçu des impacts de la COVID-19 sur les systèmes de soins de santé. Consulté le 12 avril 2021. <https://www.cihi.ca/fr/ressources-sur-la-covid-19/ lincidence-de-la-covid-19-sur-les-systemes-de-sante-du-canada/apercu-des>.

Kreindler, S.A., M.J. Schull, B.H. Rowe, M.B. Doupe et C.J. Metge. 2021. Malgré les interventions, le flux des patients aux urgences stagne dans l'Ouest urbain du Canada. Politiques de Santé 16(4): 70–83. doi:10.12927/hcpol.2021.26498.

Lange, S. et J. Rehm. 2021. Commentaire: la pandémie de COVID-19 n'est pas le moment adéquat pour alléger les restrictions sur la disponibilité de l'alcool. Politiques de Santé 16(4): 25–30. doi:10.12927/hcpol.2021.26501.

Peckham, A., J.G. Wright, H. Marani, R. Abdelhalim, D. Laxer, S. Allin et al. 2021. Donner la priorité au patient: examen de la portée des souhaits des patients au Canada. Politiques de Santé 16(4): 46–69. doi:10.12927/hcpol.2021.26499.

Sadri, H., S. Sinigallia, M. Shah, J. Vanderheyden et B. Souche. 2021. Méthode des coûts par activités en fonction du temps pour la chirurgie de la cataracte au Canada: le cas du Kensington Eye Institute. Politiques de Santé 16(4): 97–108. doi:10.12927/hcpol.2021.26496.

Thomas, S., C. Keegan, S. Barry, R. Layte, M. Jowett et C. Normand. 2013. A Framework for Assessing Health System Resilience in an Economic Crisis: Ireland as a Test Case. BMC Health Service Research 13(1): 450. doi:10.1186/1472-6963-13-450.

Webster, P. 2021. COVID-19 Highlights Canada's Care Home Crisis. The Lancet 397(10270): 183. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(21)00083-0.

Zeidler, M. 2020, 20 mars. Thousands of Hospital Beds in B.C. Cleared to Make Room for COVID-19. CBC News. Consulté le 12 avril 2021. <https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/bc-hospital-beds-covid-19-1.5505356>.

References

Ariste, R. and L. Di Matteo. 2021. Non-Official Language Concordance in Urban Canadian Medical Practice: Implications for Care during the COVID-19 Pandemic. Healthcare Policy 16(4): 84–96. doi:10.12927/hcpol.2021.26497.

Armstrong, P., V. Boscart, G. Donner, F. Ducharme, C. Estabrooks, C. Flood et al. 2020, June. Restoring Trust: COVID-19 and the Future of Long-Term Care. The Royal Society of Canada. Retrieved April 12, 2021. <https://rsc-src.ca/sites/default/files/LTC%20PB%20%2B%20ES_EN.pdf>.

Bender, D. and P. Holyoke. 2018. Why Some Patients Who Do Not Need Hospitalization Cannot Leave: A Case Study of Reviews in 6 Canadian Hospitals. Healthcare Management Forum 31(4): 121–25. doi:10.1177/0840470418755408.

Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). 2020a, November 19. COVID-19's Effect on Hospital Care Services. Retrieved April 12, 2021. <https://www.cihi.ca/en/covid-19-resources/impact-of-covid-19-on-canadas-health-care-systems/covid-19s-effect-on-hospital>.

Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). 2020b, November 19. Overview: COVID-19's Impact on Health Care Systems. Retrieved April 12, 2021. <https://www.cihi.ca/en/covid-19-resources/impact-of-covid-19-on-canadas-health-care-systems/overview-covid-19s-impact-on>.

Government of British Columbia. 2020, May 7. A Commitment to Surgical Renewal in B.C. Retrieved April 12, 2021. <https://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/health/conducting-health-research/surgical-renewal-plan.pdf>.

Government of Ontario. 2019, January. Hallway Health Care: A System Under Strain. 1st Interim Report from the Premier's Council on Improving Healthcare and Ending Hallway Medicine. Retrieved April 12, 2021. <https://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/public/publications/premiers_council/docs/premiers_council_report.pdf>.

Hartney, E. 2021. The Shadow Pandemic of Alcohol Use during COVID-19: A Canadian Health Leadership Imperative. Healthcare Policy 16(4): 17–24. doi:10.12927/hcpol.2021.26502.

Havaei, F., A. Ma, M. Leiter and A. Gear. 2021. Describing the Mental Health State of Nurses in British Columbia: A Province-Wide Survey Study. Healthcare Policy 16(4): 31–45. doi:10.12927/hcpol.2021.26500.

Holroyd-Leduc, J.M. and A. Laupacis. 2020. Continuing Care and COVID-19: A Canadian Tragedy That Must Not Be Allowed to Happen Again. CMAJ 192(23): E632–33. doi:10.1503/cmaj.201017.

Howlett, K. 2020, April 6. Ontario Hospitals Scramble to Open More Beds as They Brace for Surge in Coronavirus Cases. The Globe and Mail. Retrieved April 12, 2021. <https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-ontario-hospitals-scramble-to-open-more-beds-as-they-brace-for-surge/>.

Kreindler, S.A., M.J. Schull, B.H. Rowe, M.B. Doupe and C.J. Metge. 2021. Despite Interventions, Emergency Flow Stagnates in Urban Western Canada. Healthcare Policy 16(4): 70–83. doi:10.12927/hcpol.2021.26498.

Lange, S. and J. Rehm. 2021. Commentary: The COVID-19 Pandemic Is Not a Good Time to Weaken Restrictions on Alcohol Availability. Healthcare Policy 16(4): 25–30. doi:10.12927/hcpol.2021.26501.

Peckham, A., J.G. Wright, H. Marani, R. Abdelhalim, D. Laxer, S. Allin et al. 2021. Putting the Patient First: A Scoping Review of Patient Desires in Canada. Healthcare Policy 16(4): 46–69. doi:10.12927/hcpol.2021.26499.

Sadri, H., S. Sinigallia, M. Shah, J. Vanderheyden and B. Souche. 2021. Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing for Cataract Surgery in Canada: The Case of the Kensington Eye Institute. Healthcare Policy 16(4): 97–108. doi:10.12927/hcpol.2021.26496.

Thomas, S., C. Keegan, S. Barry, R. Layte, M. Jowett and C. Normand. 2013. A Framework for Assessing Health System Resilience in an Economic Crisis: Ireland as a Test Case. BMC Health Service Research 13(1): 450. doi:10.1186/1472-6963-13-450.

Webster, P. 2021. COVID-19 Highlights Canada's Care Home Crisis. The Lancet 397(10270): 183. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(21)00083-0.

Zeidler, M. 2020, March 20. Thousands of Hospital Beds in B.C. Cleared to Make Room for COVID-19. CBC News. Retrieved April 12, 2021. <https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/bc-hospital-beds-COVID-19-1.5505356>.

Comments

Be the first to comment on this!

Note: Please enter a display name. Your email address will not be publically displayed